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Shaker cabinets have been a favorite of designers and homeowners for hundreds of years. Invented by English Quakers in the 18th century, the style add a touch of handcrafted charm to any home. Better yet? Shaker cabinets work for traditional kitchens, as well as for more transitional and modern aesthetics. Take a look at how BOXI’s Salt Shaker cabinets elevated these kitchen renovations.

 

Clean and Contemporary

Design by IKD; Photography by Ryan McDonald; Styled by Johanna Lowe

Clean and contemporary are just two of the words homeowner Kaylee Dalton can now use to describe her newly remodeled Indiana kitchen. When she and her family moved in, dark cabinets, laminate counters, and linoleum flooring had it stuck in the 1980s, thus Dalton looked to Inspire Kitchen Design and BOXI for much-needed moderninzation.

Design by IKD; Photography by Ryan McDonald; Styled by Johanna Lowe

The two-tone kitchen, which includes a BOXI Rye Slab pantry, relies on Salt Shaker cabinets for a refreshed look. You can actually see what you have,” Dalton says. Another upside? No more stuck drawers or creaking doors. “The smooth glide of BOXI cabinets and the soft-close is a true luxury,” she adds.

The bright and open space, a welcomed contrast to its original design, also features a shiplap-clad ceiling, floating shelves, black quartz counters, and white tile.

 

Catskills Cool

Design by IKD; Photography by Kate Jordan; Styled by Raina Kattelson

Diana Lovett knew she wanted to work with BOXI on her upstate renovation, especially because the cabinets are American-made and ship quickly. “I didn’t even look anywhere else,” she says.

The Lovett family found their 19th century Catskills home pre-pandemic, and realized plenty of TLC was in-store. “We tried to keep the spirit of the older home but obviously made it modern and more functional,” she says.

Design by IKD; Photography by Photography by Kate Jordan; Styled by Raina Kattelson

Lovett worked with IKD, who crafted a clever layout with a circular window. BOXI by Semihandmade Salt Shaker cabinets anchor the historic space, while butcher block countertops are both minialist and family-friendly. Pops of color are sprinkled in through Annie Raife ceramics, vintage items from Long Weekend, and fair-trade textiles from Minna.

 

Double Duty Chic

Design by The Brownstone Boys; Photography by Nick Glimenakis; Styled by Beth Clevenstine

New York apartments are notoriously small. Just take a look at the 500-square-foot pre-war Murray Hill home of Brian Landman and Sean Gilleran. Discouraged by its lack of storage and tight layout, the pair hired The Brownstone Boys for a whole-home makeover.

After living in the space for for five years, Landman and Gilleran knew it “didn’t fit their lifestyle,” anymore, says Jordan Slocum of The Brownstone Boys. “They’re natural hosts—they love hosting friends and family—and they’re full of personality,” he says. “But, the whole apartment was all chopped up. It didn’t make any sense for their lifestyle.”

Design by The Brownstone Boys; Photography by Nick Glimenakis; Styled by Beth Clevenstine

BOXI’s Salt Shaker cabinets bring new life to the once dark, cramped kitchen, while Salt Slab cabinetry was crucial in crafting a custom closet. They now have room to host, plenty of clothing and shoe storage, a generous pantry, and even a work-from-home nook.

 

Simple at Its Best

Design by Tracy Cimba; Photography by Ryan McDonald; Styled by Kimberly Swedelius

Designer Tracy Cimba is a pro when it comes to working with Semihandmade and BOXI, and doing so on a budget. This traditional Chicago kitchen was built for a growing family who prioritizes entertaining. A statement-making double island pairs with BOXI Salt Shaker cabinets, Bedrosians Cloe tile, black hardware, and textured silver pendants for an unexpected twist.

 

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