Choosing the right hardware for your kitchen is just as important as picking out an outfit’s finishing touch. 

It’s the head-turner that can make or break a whole look: a wow-worthy necklace or a classic pair of diamond studs. And just like jewelry, hardware trends come and go, but they hold no secrets for Evan Dublin, Rejuvenation’s Vice President and Creative Director.

“The kitchen is the heart of the home and the central communal place so it needs to be relaxing but also highly-functional and practical,” says Dublin. Since joining in 2016, he has imagined the brand’s three main aesthetics: Northwest Modern, Updated Traditional, and Elegant Industrial. Together, these styles inform every new product his team designs (they also look to history for timeless inspiration). If, like many, you’re looking to update your kitchen next year, here are the trends to know in the world of hardware:

 

Brass

Brass has been trending for the last decade and according to Dublin, it’s not going anywhere next year. Rejuvenation’s Bowman Collection gives this classic metal a modern twist. It’s a collection of hefty solid brass pulls with simple graphic profiles. No matter the finish or style you choose, Dublin suggests thinking about hardware as an investment rather than a passing aesthetic. 

Bowman Cabinet Knob, Rejuvenation x Semihandmade ($12.80)

 

Mixed Metals

Dublin has found that some customers are reaching for light fixtures in a different material than their hardware of choice. “Personally, I’ve seen cooler metals start to trend again like brushed or polished nickel,” he says. “There’s a balance with mixed metals that makes a space feel both warm and cool.” The good news: you won’t have to worry about matching your finishes anymore.

Massey Drawer Pull, Rejuvenation x Semihandmade ($12.80)

 

Natural Finishes

Solid woods like oak or walnut are also gaining popularity, alongside heavily veined stones like Calcutta marble and Soapstone. “We’ve seen kitchens go more natural, clean, earthy, and inspired by honest materials choices,” he says. While Dublin can’t reveal everything that’s in the works at Rejuvenation, he hints at new collections that’ll play off this trend. 

West Slope Wood Drawer Pull, Rejuvenation ($24)

 

All for Color

While it’s not a hardware trend, Dublin notes that people are gravitating towards brighter, happier tones in the kitchen—which can affect metal choices. Because of the pandemic, people are spending more time in their homes and are looking to make the kitchen a place that feels optimistic. If repainting or replacing cabinets are not in the cards, add color with playful copper hardware.

Copper Mission Bin Pull, Rejuvenation ($11)

 

Size Matters

When choosing a knob or pull size, Dublin suggests thinking about the usage of each drawer or cabinet: What is its intention? How often is it used? “The ideal scale for a frequently used drawer is an oversized pull,” he says. When a drawer needs to be easily accessible, a larger surface area to grab onto makes practical sense. 

Large Oval Cupboard Latch, Rejuvenation x Semihandmade ($23.20)

 

Switching It Up

When purchasing hardware, there’s a simple rule of thumb that Dublin suggests customers follow. “Pulls are ideal for lower drawers and appliances, while knobs are for upper cabinets,” he says. 

Massey Round Cabinet Knob, Rejuvenation x Semihandmade ($8.80)

Comments (1)

  • The segment of your article that talked about mixing metals was something I really liked reading. One thing that has always bothered me about our current kitchen was how boring it looks since almost all of the surfaces and hardware fixtures look and feel the same, making the entire place feel very one-note. I’ll avoid this by asking for several metal fixture types when I work with a remodeling contractor in the area.

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